44 and in the end there is a beginning of a story

It’s one thing to know new truths about ourselves, more to feel these things deeply as the things we must pursue, and critical that we put these things into action, but even more important is to create an elegant interface, a way of connecting to everything we’ve been discovering every day of our lives.

A story is a most elegant way.  It allows us to come each day to live our story in a developing and unfolding way.  It’s where all things come together in words, and sentences, and movements, and chapters.

It’s where we’re able to keep control of our lives because these stories are not biographical, written by other people or forces, but they’re autobiographical, shaped by our imaginations and our actions.

SOMETHING TO DO: Here are some questions to help you reflect on the story developing for you out of this Slow Journey.  Use your journal to work through these questions, spending a few moments on each:

QUESTION 1: Why did you begin to work through the online resource for Slow Journeys?

QUESTION 2: What in your life make you want to do this?

QUESTION 3: What is the spark that has appeared for you?

QUESTION 4: Where right now do you feel the opening to a future possibility?

QUESTION 5: If that possibility of the future could talk, what would it say to you right now?

QUESTION 6: In your slow journey, what has been the most inspiring, surprising, or puzzling thing?

QUESTION 7: What about your current work or personal life frustrates you most?

QUESTION 8: What are you trying to do in this stage of your professional and private journey?

QUESTION 9: What is the collective thing you are trying to do at this stage (that is, with others)?

QUESTION 10: Given the above, what questions do you need to ask?

QUESTION 11: What does younger self (choose an younger age appropriate for you, perhaps ten or fifteen years ago) have to say to you now?

QUESTION 12: What is the footprint you want to leave on this planet when it’s time to move on?

RESOURCES YOU MAY ENJOY:
The Storytelling Animal by Jonathan Gottschall

 

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